Sophia's Blog

Sophia's Blog

THE OBESITY CODE

OBESITY IS NO LONGER JUST FOR ADULTS ITS A PANDEMIC THATS AFFECTING CHILDREN TOO

In the years 1977 to 2000, the prevalence of childhood obesity skyrocketed in every age category. Obesity in children aged 6 to 11 increased from 7% to 15.3%.

For children aged 12 to 19, it more than tripled — from 5% to 15.5%. Obesity-related diseases like type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, previously rare in children, are becoming more common. Obesity has metastasized from being solely an adult concern to being a pediatric one, too.

Childhood obesity leads to adult obesity and many future health problems, particularly cardiovascular issues. Childhood obesity is a predictor of increased mortality, but, most importantly, also a reversible risk factor. Overweight children who became normal weight as adults have the same mortality risk as those who have never been overweight.

Obesity is an energy-balance problem, one of either eating too much or exercising too little. Since six-month-olds eat only on demand and are often breastfed, it is impossible to say they eat too much.

Since six-month-olds do not walk, we can’t also say they exercise too little. Similarly, birth weight has also increased by as much as half a pound (200 grams) over the last twenty-five years. Newborns cannot eat too much or exercise too little.

What is going on here? It’s insulin. The answer is simpler once we understand the hormonal obesity theory. This tidbit examines the causes of obesity as well as the dangers attached to it. In the subsequent chapters, you’ll learn more on how to lose weight effectively.

Did you know? The fruits and vegetables you see in the supermarket have been shipped anywhere from 1,500 to 2,000 miles on average to get there. When food travels, it begins a long, slow death. This slow death depletes the nutrients of the food we eat, so our bodies are never really being nourished with what we need for optimum health.

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